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  PHOTOGRAPHY 2:: FALL SEMESTER - 2013  
  Your mission is to learn every think there is to know about operating a digital SLR camera so you can use it as the creative tool it can be, and master artificial studio lighting.  
  WEEK ! - Sept 4 - 6  
 

Hello. class discussion.

Syllabus: read in, know it, believe it : )

There is a $30.00 photo fee for this class. If you get free or reduced luches check with the bookkeeper to see if you can get the fee waved. The printed portfolio is not required in the advanced photo classes. You will all be making an online portfolio.

The photo programs at GHHS and PHS are based on the state guidelines for commercial photography. By the end of this semester you should know everything that is outlined (read through pages 8 -10) in this document.

You have all arrived at this class by different paths. You aren't all starting with the same abilities and skills. The first thing we need to do is assess where you are and what you need to do before you begin the Photo 2,3 or 4 projects.

Photoshop portion of the competency sheet.

Here are the camera instructions. They are mostly from the class camera manual. Find the answers to any questions you didn't know. If you can't figure it out from reading about it, and experimenting with the camera, ask me to help you.

We have different models of cameras. There will be some differences ,but they are basically the same.

DSLR basics

Part 1

Part 2

Photoshop Competencies: tool pallet, cropping, layers, adjustment layers, color correcting, layer masks, sharpening, size, resolution, resizing, feathering selections, black and white conversions (desaturate, B&W adjustment layer), filters, file formats, retouching (patch tool, clone stamp tool, lighten layer blend technique,dust and scratches filter), hand coloring, history pallet, vignettes (dark and soft), selecting using quickmask, saving selections, straightening, duotones/tritones, dodging and burning (not with dodging and burning tools), adjusting contrast (s curve, levels adjustments), cool edges, brushes (download, making your own), threshold command, photomerge, notes tool, actions, batch commands.

There are lot of different ways to do things in Photoshop. I want you to do things MY way : )

Sample Files: You can download or copy from this web page.

Camera safety tips:

1. Always use the camera strap.

2. Ask me for a camera. The camera cabinets are off limits to students. When you check out a camera write your name and the last 2 numbers of the serial number on the check-out list.

3. Return the camera and card to me at the end of the period. I need to sign you off. Don't leave the camera unattended.

4. Turn off the camera before inserting or removing the memory card. Be careful when inserting the memory card. If it doesn't go in easily, take it out and try again. Ask for help if you have trouble.

5.If you check out a camera for the period, don't give it to someone else to use until you check it back in.

6. Don't place the camera on the edge of the table (so people don't bump into it and knock the camera off the table). Keep the camera strap from draping over the edge of a table.

7. Don't let the camera get wet.

Photoshop basics: Setting up and saving your work space, layers, color correcting, cropping, sytaightening, retouching, (patch tool, cloan stamp tool) etc. (we will go over this in class).

Basic File Prep: You need to at least do these steps on all files you turn in: color correcting, sharpening, cropping and straightening, and saving as a jpg.

Sample Files: You can download or copy from this web page.

Tutorial Videos

Setting up a custom photoshop workspace

Adjusting color balance, brightness and contrast

Zooming

Sharpening an image

Cropping and Straightening

Dodging and Burning

Black and white conversion

Dark Vignette

Hand Tinting

Selecting with a quickmask

Combining Images

 
  WEEK 2 - Sept 9 - 13  
 

FIDM here

Read this stuff. Be sure you understand everything. If not ask me for help. There is no easy way to do this. Some things are difficult to learn, It will take work. It will be worth it.

What I have decided to do is break this info up into nine sections and have you guys to presentations to the class. We will go over this.

I wrote down who is presenting what. Ask me if you forget or weren't here when we put the groups together.

We will pick sections in class. Here is the info.CLICK HERE for a PDF.

Aperture: One of the components of exposure.The aperture is an opening in the lens. The opening is controlled by a diaphragm that is made up of a variety of adjustable metal blades on modern lenses. The early apertures were a series of small holes that increased in size and ran around the outside of a circular piece of metal. The aperture controls the depth of field and how much light enters the camera.

For the purpose of this class we will consider the aperture options or settings as being: 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22. In the real world there may be more numbers at each end as well as intermediate settings between the numbers listed.The numbers listed are considered full "stops".

Some depth of field examples examples

Depth of field video

Another depth of field video

Shutter Speed: One of the components of exposure. The shutter speed determines the length of time light enters the camera--the longer the time, the more light enters. It also controls how sharp or blurry your photograph is. It is controlled by either an electronic or mechanical shutter. It is usually in the camera directly behind the lens but is also sometimes housed in the lens itself. On early cameras the shutter was a lens cap that was placed over the lens.For our pinhole cameras the shutter will be a piece of electrical tape.

For the purpose of this class we will consider the shutter speed options or settings as being: 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, 1/2000, 1/4000, of a second. Like the aperture setting in the real world there are more numbers at each end of the scale as well as intermediate shutter speed settings. The numbers listed are considered full "stops".

Read and understand the following five links.

Read this about ISO

Read this about shutter speed and aperture

Read this about exposure controls

Read about the shutter

Read about the aperture

Exposure: It is controlled by two things: shutter speed (how long the light is contacting the imager), aperture (how wide the opening is in the lens the light is coming through). It is the amount of light coming into the camera -- usually measured by either an internal light meter, or a hand-held light meter.The film (or imaging sensor on a digital camera) needs a particular amount of light to be properly exposed. Too much light and it will be over exposed, too little light and it will be under exposed. If you go back to our ever expand water analogy it goes something like this: the aperture is like the size of the opening in a faucet. A larger faucet will release more water than a smaller faucet in a given amount of time. The shutter speed is like the amount of time you leave the faucet on--the longer it is on the more water will come out given the same size opening. The ISO is like a bucket under the faucet. The higher the ISO the smaller the bucket. The smaller the bucket the less water is needed to fill it up. Confusion arises when you are changing more than one variable at a time.

Some shutter speed examples: examples 1

ISO: On a film camera it is also referred to as film speed. It indicates the speed or light sensitivity of the film or imager. Larger numbers indicate faster film or a more sensitive imager. The larger the number, the less light is needed for proper exposure. Faster film usually has larger grain (the little dots-film grain- that make up the photograph). On a digital camera higher ISO settings turn up the gain - like electrical volume-on the sensor creating more noise (also looks like small colored dots). Some common setting are: 50, 100, 125, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200. The larger the number, the more sensitive the imager is to light--meaning it needs less light to be properly exposed.

Additional exposure info: short courses

If some of the photo vocabulary is unfamiliar to you , look up the words here: vocabulary

Be sure you can answer these questions.

Exposure video

Anything she says about film is also correct for digital.

Camera Exposure

Exposure modes.You really need to know the difference between, AV, TV, and Manual.

In the studio always use manual. Out of the studio if the aperture is most important use AV, if shutterspeed is most important use TV.

Camera Modes

 

Write a 100 or more word reflection about your favorite photographer. Name it favorite photographer. Print it and turn it in by the end of next week.

Cool quote: It starts with an idea,... but never with just reality. My photography has always been fueled by what I see when I close my eyes. Each new morning I am thankful when I pause to realize that very few other earthly endeavors could be so continuously magical.

Mastrianni

 
 

WEEK 3 - Sept 16 - 20

 
 

Monday: Still working on presentations

Tuesday: Presentations due

Wednesday: Well break out the cameras and start learning how to use them.

1. Set the camera to TV mode.Take 50 pictures that are not blurry and are properly exposed (if the camera is unable to let in enough light through the aperture (aperture number blinks in the viewfinder), try turning up the ISO. If it still blinks, turn down the shutter speed. If the camera sets the speed too slow you will have a blurry picture.

2. Set the camera to AV mode.Take 50 pictures that are not blurry and are properly exposed (if the camera is unable to let in enough light through the shutter (aperture number blinks in the viewfinder), try turning up the ISO. If it still blinks, open up (smaller number) the aperture. Even if the shutter speed isn't blinking you need to be aware of what it is. If the camera sets the speed too slow you will have a blurry picture.

3. Set the camera to M mode.Take 50 pictures that are not blurry and are properly exposed in M mode. You have to look in the viewfinder and make sure the line is lined up with the center pointer. See illustration below.

If this doesn't seem to make sense, shoot them again, and again, and...the goal is to learn how to use these modes creatively, not just try them.

Thursday: Learning how to use the cameras

Friday:Learning how to use the cameras

 
  WEEK 4 - Sept 23 - 27  
 

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  WEEK 5 - Sept 30 - Oct 4  
 

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  WEEK 6 - Oct 7 - 11  
 

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  WEEK 7 - Oct 14 - 18  
 

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  WEEK 9 - Oct 28 - Nov 1  
 

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  WEEK 11 - Nov 11 - 15  
 

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  WEEK 12 - Nov 18 - 22  
 

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  WEEK 13 - Nov 25 - 29  
 

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  WEEK 14 - Dec 2 - 6  
 

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  WEEK 15 - Dec 9 - 13  
 

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  WEEK 16 - Dec 16 - 20  
 

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  WEEK 17 - Dec 23 - 27  
 

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  WEEK 18 - Dec 30 - Jan 3  
 

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  WEEK 19 - Jan 6 - 10  
 

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  WEEK 20 - Jan 13 - 17  
 

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  WEEK 21 - Jan 20 - 24  
 

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  Week 22 – Gone  
 

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RESOURCES

 

 
 

Good Contemporary Photographers

Dark Chamber

A Lot of History

George Eastman House

PBS Photography

Glazers

B&H

DP Review

Using Your Digital Camera

Color Information

Communication Arts

Webster

Photo Links

Sports Photography

 
CONTACT    
 

Photo room